AP World History Syllabus

AP World History (Modern) 

2020-2021 Syllabus

Benjamin B. Graham


  


The goal of this class is multifaceted, but overall we will attempt to

develop a more complete understanding of world history by: exploring the

ties that bind ALL cultures together, igniting curiosity, and

encouraging individual creativity through the study of history.


The past is prologue.  What role will you play?

 

Our class ethos is to remember that Other cultures are not failed attempts at being you.

 

Stuff you need to know:

 

Google Classroom: This will be our primary source of communication (especially during virtual school).  You will be required to access Google Classroom every workday.  Our class code is: xywsixy


Remind: Immediate communication from me to you will also come through our Remind:  Please sign up with this code: 

Send a text to: 81010

Text this message: @74ckd3

 

Get a Notebook: You will need to acquire a big ol’ three ring binder (yes, even in virtual school!).  I talk more than you can imagine, and you are going to have to take a lot of

notes, and read many documents - so fill it up with a lot of paper (and grab some highlighters and colored pencils while you are at it!)

  

Weekly Reading Study Guides || Quizzes:  The weekly study guide requires each student to complete 15 – 20 identifications, and several essays. Each essay will fall into one of the following categories: Short Answer Questions (SAQ), Long Essay, or Document Based Questions. You will turn in the completed study guide with your weekly quiz on the reading that will (typically) occur on the following Friday.


Exams:  We have 6 Thematic/Unit Exams throughout this course.  They count 40-50% of your grade.  The course culminates in the College Board AP Exam (Monday, May 10) which determines whether college credit is given for the completion of this course.


Projects: For each Nine Week grading period (unit), each student must complete a research project. You will have approximately 3 weeks to complete it. You will (typically) NOT be provided class time to work on it.


Text: Our primary texts include: The Earth and Its Peoples; REA: AP World History Crash Course Review Book, The Human Record, and Rethinking Globalization.  


Go get some Index cards, and colored sharpies (for In-Person Learning only):  We will use index cards daily to answer pop quizzes, and to write short essays.  We also use colored sharpies (or highlighters) in notetaking. One pack of cards/sharpies should get you started.


 

600bce – 1200ce

The Global Tapestry, Part 1

August - September 2020 (5 weeks)

(5% - 10% of Exam Score)


Essential Questions: Why study History?  How did we get here?

Why is the year 1200 a turning point?

Skills: Writing the SAQ, Document analysis, Global Geography, PERSIA?

9 Weeks Research Project - TBA


Thematic Exam – Week of September 25


Unit 1: The Global Tapestry, Part 1

You'll explore how states formed, expanded, and declined in areas of the world during the period c. 600–c. 1200 and the related political, social, and cultural developments of that time.


Topics may include:

The emergence of States in:

Africa

Afro-Eurasia

East Asia

Europe

South and Southeast Asia

The Americas

Global and regional religions and belief systems

(8%–10% of exam score)


Themes: Humans and Environment, Economic Systems, Religious and Cultural Interactions, Society, Governing, and Technology. 

(PERSIA: Political, Economic, Religion, Society, Interaction with environment, Arts and Technology)


Outside Readings:

Tao of Pooh. By Benjamin Hoff (Dutton Books: 1982).

Guns, Germs, and Steel. By Jared Diamond. (Norton, 1999).

Ishmael. By Daniel Quinn. (Bantam, 1991).

Tao Te Ching. By Lao Tzu. Translated by D.C. Lau. (Penguin Books, 1963)

Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World Through Islamic Eyes by Tamim Ansary, (2010)


1200-1450 Period

Global Tapestry II, and Networks of Exchange

Time Period: October – November, 2020 (6 - 7 weeks)

(5%  - 10% of Exam Score)


Essential Questions: Globalization in 1200? Geo-political power balance of the world? Why is the year 1200 a new era?

Skills: Writing the LEQ, Document analysis for POV, Bias


Thematic Exam - week of November 8


9 Weeks Project – TBA


Unit 2: Networks of Exchange

As you continue your study of the period c. 1200–c. 1450, you’ll learn how areas of the world were linked through trade and how these connections affected people, cultures, and environments.


Topics may include:

The Silk Roads

The Mongol Empire

The Indian Ocean trading network

The trans-Saharan trade routes

The effects of cross-cultural interactions

Themes: Humans and Environment, Economic Systems, Religious and Cultural Interactions, Society, Governing,  and Technology. 

(PERSIA: Political, Economic, Religion, Society, Interaction with environment, Arts and Technology)


Outside Reading:

The Adventures of Ibn Battuta: A Muslim Traveler of the 14th Century. By

Ross E. Dunn. (University of California Press, 2004).

Genghis Khan and the making of the Modern World. By Jack Weatherford

(Three Rivers Press, 2005).

1421: The Year China Discovered America. By Gavin Menzies (Harper Perennial, 2004).

 


1450-1750

Land Based Empires, Transoceanic Interconnections

Time Period: November, 2020 – January, 2021 (6 weeks)

(30% of Exam Score)


Thematic Exam/Midterm – By the week of January 24

Class Project: TBA


Unit 3: Land-Based Empires

You'll begin your study of the period c. 1450–c. 1750 with an exploration of the empires that held power over large contiguous areas of land.


Topics may include:

The development of the Manchu, Mughal, Ottoman, and Safavid empires

How rulers of empires maintained their power

Religious developments in empires

(12%–15% of exam score)


Unit 4: Transoceanic Interconnections

Continuing your study of the period c. 1450–c. 1750, you’ll learn about advances in ocean exploration, the development of new maritime empires, and the effects of new cross-cultural encounters.


Topics may include:

The influence of scientific learning and technological innovation

The Columbian Exchange

Development and expansion of maritime empires

Internal and external challenges to state power


Changes to social hierarchies linked to the spread of empires

(12%–15% of exam score)


Themes: Humans and Environment, Economic Systems, Religious and Cultural Interactions, Society, Governing, Technology. 

(PERSIA: Political, Economic, Religion, Society, Interaction with environment, Arts and Technology)


Outside Reading:

A Voyage Long and Strange: Rediscovering the New World.  By Tony Horwitz. (Henry Holt and Co, 2008).

1453: The Holy War for Constantinople and the Clash of Islam and the

West.  By Roger Crowley. (Hyperion, 2006).

Gunpowder: Alchemy, Bombards, and Pyrotechnics: The History of the

Explosive that changed the World. By Jack Kelly. (Basic Books, 2004)



1750-1900

Revolutions, and Consequences of Industrialization

Time Period: February - March, 2021 (6 weeks)

(30% of Exam Score)

Skills: Writing the Document Based Question

Thematic Exam - By the week of March 12

9 Weeks project - TBA

 

 Unit 5: Revolutions

You’ll start your study of the period c. 1750–c. 1900 by exploring the new political ideas and developments in technology that led to large-scale changes in governments, society, and economies.


Topics may include:
The Enlightenment
Revolutions against existing governments and the birth of new nation-states The Industrial Revolution
Trade policies
The development of industrial economies

(12%–15% of Score)


Unit 6: Consequences of Industrialization

You'll continue to investigate the period c. 1750–c. 1900 and learn how the different states acquired and expanded control over colonies and territories.


Topics may include:

State expansion in the 18th and 19th centuries

Resistance to imperialism

The growth of the global economy

Economic imperialism

Causes and effects of new migration patterns

(12%–15% of exam score)


Themes: Humans and Environment, Economic Systems, Religious and Cultural Interactions, Society, Governing, and Technology. 

(PERSIA: Political, Economic, Religion, Society, Interaction with environment, Arts and Technology)


Outside Readings:

King Leopold’s Ghost. By Adam Hochschild. (Mariner, 1999).

Salt: A World History. By Mark Kurlansky. (Penguin Books, 2002).

Cod: A Biography of The Fish That Changed The World.  By Mark Kurlansky (Penguin Books, 1998).



1900-Present

Global Conflict, Decolonization, and Globalization

Time Period: March – April, 2021 (7 Weeks)

(30% of Exam Score)

9 Weeks Project – TBA

Thematic Exam – By the week of April 24


Unit 7: Global Conflict

You'll begin your study of the period c. 1900–present by learning about the global conflicts that dominated this era.


Topics may include:

Changes in the global political order after 1900

World War I: its causes and how it was fought

The interwar period
World War II: its causes and how it was fought

 Mass atrocities after 1900

 

Unit 8: Cold War and Decolonization

As you continue exploring the period c. 1900–present, you’ll learn about colonies’ pursuits of independence and the global power struggle between capitalism and communism.


Topics may include:

The causes, effects, and ending of the Cold War

The spread of communism

How colonies in Asia and Africa achieved independence
The creation of new states after decolonization


Unit 9: Globalization

You'll continue your study of the period c. 1900–present by investigating the causes and effects of the unprecedented connectivity of the modern world.


Topics may include:   

Advances in technology and their effects
Disease  
Environment and Economic change 
Movements for reform   
How globalization changed culture
New international institutions


Themes: Humans and Environment, Economic Systems, Religious and Cultural Interactions, Society, Governing, Technology. (PERSIA: Political, Economic, Religion, Society, Interaction with environment, Arts and Technology)


Outside Reading:

This Fleeting World, By David Christian (Berkshire, 2007).  

The World That Trade Created: By Pomerantz and Topik. (ME Sharpe, 2006).

Runaway World: How Globalization Is Reshaping Our Lives. By Anthony

Giddens.  (Routledge, 2002).