Family and Consumer Sciences Education

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PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
 
Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) Education empowers individuals to manage the challenges of living and working in a diverse global society. Students develop human literacy as they master a complex set of essential skills and knowledge needed to achieve quality of life. They gain career preparedness as they acquire readiness to participate in a rapidly changing workforce and global economy. Family and Consumer Sciences students at NBHS repare for family life, work life, and careers in several core areas:
 
• Consumer Education and Resource Management
• Food Production and Services
• Foods, Nutrition and Wellness
• Housing, Interiors, and Design
• Textiles, Apparel, and Fashion
 
The mission of Family and Consumer Sciences Education is to prepare students for family life, work life, and careers in Family and Consumer Sciences by providing opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed.

COURSE OFFERINGS IN FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES


Apparel and Textile Production I

Course Number:                                            FA31

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20*(or 2 per sewing machine)

Prerequisite:                                                  None

In this course students are introduced to clothing production in the areas of preparation for clothing construction, basic clothing construction techniques, consumer decisions, textiles, historical perspectives and design, and career opportunities. Emphasis is placed on students applying these construction and design skills to apparel and home fashion. Art, mathematics, and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing.   Apprenticeship and Cooperative education are not available for this course.   Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.  

*For safety reasons, enrollment is not to exceed 20 in this course.

Apparel and Textile Production II

Course Number                                             FA32

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20* (or 2 per sewing machine)

Prerequisite:                                                  FA31 Apparel I

In this course students are introduced to advanced clothing and housing apparel development skills. The use of fibers and fabrics is combined with design and construction techniques to develop and produce clothing or housing apparel products. A real or simulated apparel business enterprise and FCCLA activities allow students to apply instructional strategies and workplace readiness skills to an authentic experience and to develop a portfolio. Mathematics and science are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning and job shadowing.  Apprenticeship is not available for this course.  Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.  

*For safety reasons, enrollment is not to exceed 20 in this course. 

Career Management

Course Number:                                           CC45

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       30

Prerequisite:                                                  None

This course prepares students to locate, secure, keep, and change careers. Emphasis is placed on self-assessment of characteristics, interests, and values; education and career exploration; evaluation of career information and creation of a career plan. Based on the National Career Development Guidelines, skills learned in this course include, but are not limited to communications, interpersonal skills, problem solving, personal management and teamwork. English language arts are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include business/industry field trips, internships, job shadowing, and service learning. Student participation in Career and Technical Student Organization, (CTSO) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.     

Foods I

Course Number:                                           FN41

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20* (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)

Prerequisite:                                                  None

This course examines the nutritional needs of the individual. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of diet to health, kitchen and meal management, food preparation and sustainability for a global society, and time and resource management.  English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include service learning and job shadowing.  Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course.  Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.  

*For safety and sanitation reasons, enrollment should not exceed 20 in this course.

Foods II Technology

Course Number:                                           FN43

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20* (or 4-5 per kitchen)

Prerequisite/Corequisite:                              FN41 Foods I or FH21 Culinary Arts and Hospitality I or Environmental Science or Physical Science or Biology or Chemistry

This course explores the food industry from the farm to the table using skills in food science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.  Government regulations, emerging trends, biotechnology, and technological career opportunities from scientists to technicians will be presented.  The student examines production, processing, preparation, preservation, and packaging principles along the farm to table continuum. The student begins to understand how food technology affects the food that he/she eats. English language arts are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.  Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.  

*For safety and sanitation reasons, enrollment should not exceed 20 in this course             

Interior Design I

Course Number:                                           FI51

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       25

Prerequisite:                                                  None

This course focuses on housing needs and options of individuals and families at various stages of the life cycle.  Emphasis is placed on selecting goods and services and creating functional, pleasing living environments using sound financial decisions and principles of design.  Topics of study include elements and principles of design, backgrounds and furnishings, architectural styles and features, and functional room design.  Art and mathematics are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.  Apprenticeship is not available for this course.  Family, Career Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.             

Interior Design II

Course Number:                                           FI52

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       25   

Prerequisite:                                                  FI51 Interior Design I

This course prepares students for entry-level and technical work opportunities in the residential and non-residential interior design fields.  Students deepen their understanding of design fundamentals and theory by designing interior plans to meet living space needs of specific individuals or families.  Topics include application of design theory to interior plans and production, selection of materials, and examination of business procedures. Art and mathematics are reinforced.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.  Apprenticeship is not available for this course.  Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.   

Personal Finance

Course Number:                                           BF05

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       25

Hours of Instruction:                                    135 (block) 150 (regular)

Prerequisite:                                                  None

This course prepares students to understand economic activities and challenges of individuals and families, the role of lifestyle goals in education and career choices, procedures in a successful job search, financial forms used in independent living, and shopping options and practices for meeting consumer needs. The course also prepares students to understand consumer rights, responsibilities and information, protect personal and family resources, and apply procedures for managing personal finances. English language arts and mathematics are reinforced in this course.  Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.  Apprenticeship and cooperative education are not available for this course.  DECA (an association for Marketing

Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.   

ProStart I®

Course Number:                                           FH71

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20* (or 4-5 per kitchen)

Prerequisite                                                   None (Foods I recommended)

This national credentialing and fundamental foodservice course allow students to master culinary techniques such as stocks, sauces and soups, fruits and vegetables, and potatoes and grains.  A heavy emphasis is placed on safety and sanitation, including preparing and serving safe food and preventing accidents and injuries.  Students learn about successful customer relations, communication skills, management and foodservice cost.  Students also learn about the history of the foodservice industry and techniques used to build a foodservice career.  Students should complete 200 hours towards the required 400-hour paid or unpaid one-credit internship, which will count toward the National ProStart ® Certificate of Achievement at the conclusion of ProStart® II. English, language arts, and mathematics are reinforced. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course include cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing.

Apprenticeship is not available for this course. Students are eligible to compete at the state and national levels of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) and N.C. ProStart® Invitational and National ProStart® Invitational. Community service and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

*For safety reasons, enrollment should not exceed 20 in this course. 

Go to http://www.nraef.org/ProStart/Program-Overview for information on the student credentialing program.         

ProStart II®

Course Number:                                           FH72

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       20* (or 4-5 per laboratory kitchen)

Prerequisite:                                                  FH71 ProStart I®

In this national credentialing, one credit, and second level fundamental food service course, students study advanced skills relevant to the hospitality industry, including tourism and the retail industry. Advanced food service skills include breakfast food and salads, basic nutrition, salads and garnishes, meat, poultry, seafood, and desserts, and baked goods. Service skills are refined through the art of service and communicating with customers. Students learn sustainability, purchasing and industry control, standard accounting practices and how to build restaurant sales through marketing and the menu.  A heavy emphasis is placed on global cuisine.  Students will complete the remainder of a required 400-hour paid or unpaid one-credit internship, which will count toward the National ProStart® Certificate of Achievement.  Workbased learning strategies appropriate for this course include apprenticeship, cooperative education, entrepreneurship, internship, mentorship, school-based enterprise, service learning, and job shadowing. Students are encouraged to participate at the state and national levels of Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) and N.C. ProStart® Invitational and National ProStart® Invitational. Community service and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.

*For safety reasons, enrollment should not exceed 20 in this course. 

Go to http://www.nraef.org/ProStart/Program-Overview for information on the student credentialing program. 

CTE Advanced Studies

Course Number:                                           CS95 

Recommended Maximum Enrollment:       25

Prerequisite:                                                  Two technical credits in one Career Cluster

This culminating course is for juniors and seniors who have earned two technical credits, one of which is a completer course, in one Career Cluster. The Advanced Studies course must augment the content of the completer course and prepare students for success in transitioning to post-secondary education and future careers. Students work under the guidance of a teacher with expertise in the content of the completer course in collaboration with community members, business representatives, and other school-based personnel. The four parts of the course include writing a research paper, producing a product, developing a portfolio, and delivering a presentation. Students demonstrate their abilities to use 21st century skills. DECA (an association for Marketing Education students), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), FFA, Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA), Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA), SkillsUSA, and Technology Student Association (TSA) competitive events, community service, and leadership activities provide the opportunity to apply essential standards and workplace readiness skills through authentic experiences.